Isotrope Links

Affiliations

About

Isotrope, LLC incubates innovative initiatives in communications technology. Formed in 2010, Isotrope is the product of a three decade long relationship between two enterprising radio engineering colleagues, David Maxson and Steve Riggs. Their combined knowledge, experience and creativity in wireless and broadcast communications is Isotrope’s catalyst for launching new services. Watch this space for new ideas and commentary .

Isotrope Wireless

Offering industry and municipalities total support in design, specification, evaluation, benchmarking and construction of wireless facilities. Isotrope uses carrier class signal propagation modeling software combined with carrier class drive testing equipment to provide clear and accurate coverage maps. Isotrope is equipped to measure, model and analyze signals both indoors and out. In addition, we assist communities in managing sensible wireless deployment; balancing coverage needs with aesthetic & zoning demands, more.

Isotrope Consulting

Isotrope’s communications engineering team has advised start-ups and settled businesses on system requirements development, protocol design, development and testing of new technologies in radio communications, studio and transmission facility design/construction. Some examples of our work:  Radio EPG project for NAB FASTROAD, RBDS protocol for proprietary application, wireless broadband drive testing for 7200 miles of a state’s roadways, improvement of a digital radio service’s encoding of country identification code within constrained data space, studio consolidation, HD-Radio facility installation. more

RFSigns.com

RFSigns.com is the authoritative source for high quality safety signs and markers for radio communications facilities. RFSigns products are standards-compliant and very durable.

 

Because we know you’re going to ask….

What’s an isotrope?

That’s right, the word looks like “isotope” with an extra “r” in it.  Isotrope is a made-up word in English — derived from the characteristic of “isotropy” (n) that indicates something has the same characteristic in all directions. The adjective “isotropic” is applied to such things that have isotropy. (an “isotropic antenna” is endowed with isotropy))

For instance, much of the analysis of the cosmos assumes the universe is isotropic — in other words, no matter which direction the observer looks, the universe has the same characteristics, so that what we learn about galaxies or stars, or the expansion of the universe in one direction, can be assumed to apply in any other direction.

In radio communications, the ideal antenna is an isotropic antenna. It produces (or receives) the same amount of energy in all directions — its antenna pattern is spherical. In the physical world, there are physical constraints that preclude the design of a perfectly isotropic antenna.

In English there is a noun for the characteristic (isotropy) and an corresponding adjective (isotropic) for a thing that has the characteristic, but there is no noun for any thing that has the characteristic. It seemed logical that an isotropic thing could be classified as an “isotrope.” Our ideal antenna, ideal star, and ideal universe are isotropes. Our ideal company, one that gleams with technical creativity, is Isotrope, LLC.